1204 Avenida Juan Ponce de León
San Juan, San Juan, 00907
Puerto Rico

9392807770

The practice of Ricardo Morales-Hernández(b.1980) consists in drawing a personal, political and cosmic story. He uses analog, digital and biological media with a main focus in extemporal drawing. Known for his paradisiac imagery evoking musical systems that reminisce the natural surroundings of the colony of Puerto Rico. Historical relations can be traced from: primitive markings, medieval marginalia, neo-expressionism and post-digital aesthetics while at the same time questioning the dominant discourses of contemporary art. He deserted studies in Media Arts, Religion and Social Sciences and been recipient of AIR–CPW- Andy Warhol Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and Center for Image Science in Austria among others. Currently he works from San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Sea


October 3, 2017
Fire Manifesto

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Some experts seems to notice the difference between real and fake diamonds. Many people say that the transformation of carbon into diamonds it’s the most natural of processes. To presence the birth of a natural diamond, enough pressure, heat and time suddenly or progressively change the constitution. The miracle takes place and now is irreversible. And it is so for the conversion of other natural organisms, like butterfly metamorphosis for example, food preparation, digestion, sex or growing.   

It is scarcity and purity that give great value to diamonds.  As decay seems to be a universal constant in a material world, it’s natural for us to desire something less perishable, more steady and desirable. Something as Love, gold or diamonds. Friends, framed butterflies or electronic bank funds, renewable energy, happiness, water or food stocks. In order to gratify this desire there is another conversion. This conversion (of the imagination inventory into the material world in the sense of acquiring or becoming) ignite a very deep power struggle. Sinful enough to be pathetic and more destructive than a category 5 hurricane of death.

As I write in a traffic jam sneaking for internet reception, at the 14th day of Hurricane Maria, there are still areas of Puerto Rico totally destroyed and unreachable. 3.5 million citizens abandon normality or accept new norms of survivalism in my post industrial island. The current President of United States, Mr. Trump visits the colony of Puerto Rico on a questionable humanitarian 5-hour trip circus. The institutional relations between USA and Puerto Rico are nothing more than ambiguous. Lives represent budget numbers. And meanwhile the crisis give voices to very specific cases. 

Meanwhile, I am preparing charcoal from decaying tropical forest and making artworks that metaphorically can become diamonds and we got the blessings and the curse of getting hit by 2 Hurricanes revealing a deeper crisis. Nature stand as witness for it is a forced autumn in tropical land. The skin of the forest is burned. However, the intensity of the devastation is incomparable with the vulnerability and the human brokenness that we have seen this days. Desperation spread as a wildfire. Artificial development is in pause, in the way of becoming more human or more sinner or consumers or egotistic or compassionate or compulsive or exploited islander or marginal foe or struggling single mother or colonial shame or university student or disconnected villager or fragile soul. The few analog media outlets that survived in the early days of the crisis, flood the waves with interminable pain.

Lust as fire also seems to govern emotional, political and the economical arena. Not only on my territory. It’s spread. Speculation, technology and science had give us a long power trip sense, a domestication of natural means, a new kind of fast lure or religion for survival or success. Omniscience hooked on internet feeds, opinionated support and consent with our social media ghettos and nice prognostics from weather infographics.

But it is patience that gives character, and character delivers otherworldly hope in so many forms. Slow, slow fire and pressure and time. Analog ticking of the clock, hearth and rhythm, struggle and sunshine mix. It’s true that Hurricane Irma and Maria totally destroyed many physical, natural and living beings in the Caribbean. And my studio in the rural area of Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico is one of them. Last week, I finally had access to the area and my eyes couldn't believe what they were seeing. Some of you know that I've been working for sometime with the concept of Divine Judgment throughout natural means, water, fire, and wind. It is not the same to draw it than to live and walk among it. 

This same carbon-diamond shaping reality, is the case of the kingdom of God. Announced surely and coming slowly or here. Coming soon, brewed as an eternal coffee of a thousands years, emerging and pervading, imminent, eternal and so marginal. Coming in the form of judgement or mercy. Multiform views of the same reality. Pervasive.

Some people said that Leonardo Da’Vinci was scared about the idea of end of the world, specially via water. Minuscule forms in his water studies depicts full cities been devoured or transformed. Also John Martin, the apocalyptic painter was pretty obsessed with the biblical idea of an epic fire consummation as the apostle Peter tells:

“But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up.”        —2Pe 3:10 KJV


What's left is to put our sight to the Invisible.

Ricardo Morales-Hernández
2017

 
SDG-017-002, 2017 Artist made charcoal on canvas.30x40  

SDG-017-002, 2017
Artist made charcoal on canvas.30x40
 

 
View from landscape Aguas Buenas Puerto Rico. Cross (Post-Irma Pre Maria) 2017

View from landscape Aguas Buenas Puerto Rico.
Cross (Post-Irma Pre Maria) 2017

 
View from the Charcoal Studio, Aguas Buenas Puerto Rico, June, 2017

View from the Charcoal Studio, Aguas Buenas Puerto Rico,
June, 2017

View from the Charcoal Studio, Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico, September, 2017 (post María)

View from the Charcoal Studio, Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico,
September, 2017 (post María)

SDG-016-007, 2016 Artist made charcoal 56x42

SDG-016-007, 2016
Artist made charcoal 56x42

 
 
SDG-016-019 Artist made charcoal on canvas and wood. 9x6' aprox II Bienal Tropical. Curated by Pablo de la Barra, Marina Reyes & Stefan Benchoam. 2016

SDG-016-019
Artist made charcoal on canvas and wood.
9x6' aprox

II Bienal Tropical. Curated by Pablo de la Barra, Marina Reyes & Stefan Benchoam. 2016

 
 
 
 
process, 2015-2017

process, 2015-2017

Thus, that nature in a tree, by which it puts forth buds, shoots out branches, and brings forth leaves and fruit, is a disposition that terminates in its own complete self. And so the disposition in the sun to shine, or abundantly to diffuse its fullness, warmth, and brightness is only a tendency to its own most glorious and complete state. So God looks on the communication of himself and the emanation of his infinite glory to belong to the fullness and completeness of himself, as though he were not in his most glorious state without it. -

Jonathan Edwards-The End For Which God Created the World

 

 
 
 
Stick collection (Process) Dorado, 2016

Stick collection (Process)
Dorado, 2016

 
 
 
 
 
Sea. Estudios del Agua / Studies of Water SDG(SEA)-016-016. 2010-2016 Acrylic, canvas, paper, collage, construction chalk, poly and sand on canvas. 56x42"

Sea. Estudios del Agua / Studies of Water
SDG(SEA)-016-016. 2010-2016
Acrylic, canvas, paper, collage, construction chalk,
poly and sand on canvas. 56x42"

 
IMG_4566.jpeg
View from the Compost Studio, Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico. November 2017 (post Maria)

View from the Compost Studio, Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico.
November 2017 (post Maria)

 
 

Integrity is not a virtue we posses
is a virtue to be pursued
and protected
in the boundaries of humility
and acknowledge a deep, raw, deep understanding
that we are dust

-
Excerpt of the poem
Integrity by Jeanine Martínez

 

 

 
 

View from the Compost Studio, Aguas Buenas, Puerto Rico, June 2017

 
 

Referential

John Martin The Great Day of His Wrath circa 1851

John Martin
The Great Day of His Wrath circa 1851

The Destruction of Leviathan Doré

The Destruction of Leviathan
Doré

 
 
Rafael Tufiño. Fuego, Fuego, Fuego Portafolio de Plena, 1953-1954 

Rafael Tufiño. Fuego, Fuego, Fuego Portafolio de Plena, 1953-1954 

 
 
Leonardo DaVinci Studies of Water

Leonardo DaVinci
Studies of Water

Leonardo DaVinci Visions of the end of the world / A Deluge http://faculty.virginia.edu/Fiorani/NEH-Institute/essays/stewart

Leonardo DaVinci
Visions of the end of the world / A Deluge

http://faculty.virginia.edu/Fiorani/NEH-Institute/essays/stewart

The last manifestation of Leonardo’s art of expression was in his series of pictorial sketches Visions of the End of the World (c. 1514–15). There Leonardo’s power of imagination—born of reason and fantasy—attained its highest level. Leonardo suggested that the immaterial forces in the cosmos, invisible in themselves, appear in the material things they set in motion. What he had observed in the swirling of water and eddying of air, in the shape of a mountain boulder and in the growth of plants, now assumed gigantic shape in cloud formations and rainstorms. He depicted the framework of the world as splitting asunder, but even in its destruction there occurs—as the monstrously “beautiful” forms of the unleashed elements show—the self-same laws of order, harmony, and proportion that presided at the world’s creation. These rules govern the life and death of every created thing in nature. Without any precedent, these “visions” are the last and most original expressions of Leonardo’s art—an art in which his perception based on saper vedere seems to have come to fruition.

 

 

 

 
 
 

Answer me, O LORD, answer me, that this people may know that You, O LORD, are God, and that You have turned their heart back again." Then the fire of the LORD fell and consumed the burnt offering and the wood and the stones and the dust, and licked up the water that was in the trench. When all the people saw it, they fell on their faces; and they said, "The LORD, He is God; the LORD, He is God."…

1 Kings 18:38

Elijah on Mt. Carmel Dura Europos synagogue, c. 245 CE.

Elijah on Mt. Carmel
Dura Europos synagogue, c. 245 CE.